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East Coast Astro  |  Announcements/Outreach  |  Dark Site Rendezvous  |  coyle
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Author Topic: coyle  (Read 1332 times)

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Offline djpontone

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coyle
« on: March 12, 2015, 04:26:49 PM »
Tonight.



Offline djpontone

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Re: coyle
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2015, 09:01:56 AM »
Igor ,fred the lock was difficult to open needs lube [w-d40 or ky] Beware!Lovejoy looked kool next to E.T.Weather permitting will be down next week. clear skies to all .dan

Offline djpontone

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Re: coyle
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2015, 03:47:32 PM »

Offline MikeM

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Re: coyle
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2015, 07:48:45 AM »
All alone at Coyle. Hope the skies accommodated your visit.
Mike
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Offline JoeStieber

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Re: coyle
« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2015, 04:01:06 PM »
I too was at Coyle Field on Thursday night, March 12, arriving about 8:30 pm, around the end of astronomical twilight. I left shortly after 11 pm (i.e., I arrived after Dan and left before him). The overhead sky wasnít too bad, but there were some passing thin clouds and it was a bit murky towards the horizon.

Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy), while distinctly fainter than its peak in mid-January, was still a fine binocular sight (magnitude estimates at the time put it in the high 5 range). I didnít see it naked eye (although I didnít try very hard to do so), but the coma was easy to see in my 16x70ís with a very faint tail extending half to three-quarters of a degree slightly east of north. It was attractively located near the center of an inverted isosceles triangle formed by Delta, Chi and Phi Cassiopeiae that fit nicely in the 4-degree field of the 16x70ís. Delta (Ruchbah) is magnitude 2.7, so it was easy to spot naked eye for locating the comet a degree to its south, while the other two stars are magnitude 4.7 and 4.9 respectively, so they were bright in the binoculars. Phi is also one of the ďeyesĒ of the ET Cluster (NGC 457). In my 12.5-inch scope, the coma showed a hint of greenish color and a faint tail of similar length to the binocular view.

Seeing Lovejoy so easily at Coyle Thursday night was quite a contrast to the view I had last Wednesday night (March 11) from the roof of the Franklin Institute in center-city Philadelphia, where it was a small, barely-visible blotch in my 10x50 binoculars. Had it not been so close to Ruchbah, I might not have located it. I suppose seeing most any comet from a center-city location is an accomplishment.

I also looked for C/2015 D1 (SOHO). Itís actually the remains of a disintegrated comet thatís been moving higher along the southern side of the double row of stars making up the Andromeda stick figure. Last night, it was roughly between M31 and M33. I had looked with the 16x70ís unsuccessfully the previous Sunday evening at Coyle, so I wanted to try at least once with the scope before it faded completely away. Although I had no trouble finding the appropriate star field, I did not see any haze representing the cometís debris. Unfortunately, the M31-M33 area is getting low at the end of twilight, and from Coyle, youíre also looking towards the Philadelphia light dome in that direction (in addition to the murkiness that was present along the horizon). Correspondingly, M33 and M110 were difficult to see in the scope, and M31 wasnít visible naked eye.

Other than that, I just did some casual observing of miscellaneous deep sky objects. I also looked at Jupiter since there were simultaneous transits of the Great Red Spot, Io and Ioís shadow already in progress at the end of twilight. Unfortunately, the seeing didnít seem that good and my mirror didnít fully cool down until the transits were over, so I didnít get much of a view of the GRS or Ioís shadow. However, I did see Io leaving the disc as a pimple on the western limb around 9 pm. I also spotted magnitude 9.0 asteroid (7) Iris in Sextans with the scope. Iíve never knowingly seen it before, and besides being a new object for me, I wanted to check on an apparent inconsistency between SkyTools primary and supplemental asteroid databases. Iris was close to a 10th magnitude star, which provided a good positional reference and showed that the supplemental database yielded the accurate location.

The Clear Sky Chart looks good for tonight (March 17), so I hope to be back there again. I want to take a stab at C/2015 C2 (SWAN) near Mars.
Joe Stieber | Visual Observer
Discovery 12.5" f/5 Newtonian reflector
William Optics 80 mm f/6 triplet apo refractor
Fujinon 16x70 and Swarovski 10x42 binoculars

East Coast Astro  |  Announcements/Outreach  |  Dark Site Rendezvous  |  coyle
 

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